Archive for Prevent Cancer

Breast cancer is a dominant fear for many women. American women have one of the highest rates of breast cancer in the world. About 12% of American women will develop breast cancer in their lifetime and approximately 2% will develop ovarian cancer.

Everyone has BRCA-1 AND BRCA-2 genes. These genes help suppress tumors because they can repair damaged DNA.

Some people inherit damaged or altered BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 genes, making them at higher risk for breast or ovarian cancer.

Women with family members who have been diagnosed with breast cancer or ovarian cancer before the age of fifty, may decide to opt for genetic testing and counseling.

The mere presence of BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 mutations or any other breast cancer gene does not guarantee you will get the disease. Environmental and dietary factors play a central role in determining whether these genes are actually expressed.

About half of the women who carry these rare, potent genes do not get breast cancer.

MEDICAL OPTIONS

Physicians and genetic counselors normally offer women with damaged genes three options:

  • Watch and wait – Get mammograms and/or MRIs every six months to increase your odds for early detection.
  • Radical surgery – Have your breasts, ovaries and/or fallopian tubes removed.
  • Take chemopreventive drugs for the rest of your life – Tamoxifen raises the risks for stroke, uterine cancer, cataracts, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

THE FOURTH OPTION

Watch and wait while eating a diet free of animal-based foods. Add in regular monitoring for those at very high risk.

The American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) is considered one of the world’s leading authorities on diet and cancer. Based on the best available research, their scientists came up with a bottom-line message:

“Diets that revolve around whole-plant foods – vegetables, whole grains, fruits, and beans – cut the risk of many cancers, and other diseases as well.”

There is a good deal of research about breast cancer risk and prevention. I have written much about the whole-food, plant-based diet, so I will let you research and determine how you can incorporate it into your life. My two books, Diet and Cancer: Is There a Connection? and Coco’s Healthy Cooking can help you get started. For a link to the books on Amazon, check the boxes in the right margin.

In this post, I want to offer you some additional information for reducing your risk of breast cancer.

ALCOHOL

In 2014, the World Health Organization stated that, regarding breast cancer, no amount of alcohol is safe. The carcinogen isn’t alcohol itself. The culprit is actually the toxic breakdown product of alcohol called acetaldehyde, which can form in your mouth almost immediately after you take a sip.

MELATONIN

Maximizing melatonin levels may help suppress cancer growth by putting cancer cells to sleep at night. Researchers have found that blind women may have just half the odds of breast cancer as sighted women.

Conversely, women who work night shifts appear to be at increased risk for breast cancer.

Researchers at Harvard University found that meat consumption was the only food significantly associated with lower melatonin production and Japanese researchers have reported an association between higher vegetable intake and higher melatonin levels in the urine. So eat your vegetables and give up the meat.

EXERCISE

Studies have found that walking at a moderate pace for an hour or more a day is associated with significantly lower breast cancer risk.

CARCINOGENS

HCAs (heterocyclic amines) are chemicals formed when muscle meat, including beef, pork, fish, and poultry, is cooked using high-temperature methods. Eating well-done meat is associated with increased risk of breast cancer. HCAs appear able both to initiate and to promote cancer growth.

In 2008, researchers discovered that the livers of humans fed cooked chicken were only able to detoxify about half of these carcinogens.

Some environmental chemicals are known to promote the growth of cancer cells, especially in those eating excessive quantities of meat, milk and fish. Ninety to ninety-five percent of our exposure to these chemicals comes from consuming animal products.

Another group of environmental chemicals are found in auto exhaust, factory smoke stacks, petroleum tar products and tobacco smoke. These chemicals have recently been shown to adversely affect the BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 genes of breast cancer cells grown in the laboratory.

Studies have shown that environmental chemicals seem to play a far less significant role for breast cancer than the kind of foods we choose to eat.

FAT AND CHOLESTEROL

Reducing dietary fat from the normal 30% in most American diets to 6% is associated with lower breast cancer risk.

Higher dietary fat is associated with higher blood cholesterol and both are associated with higher female hormone levels and more breast cancer.

Reducing dietary fat was associated with lower breast cancer risk. This usually means less consumption not only of fat but, more importantly, of animal-based foods.

Cancer appears to feed on cholesterol. Tumors may suck up so much cholesterol that cancer patients’ cholesterol levels tend to plummet as their cancer grows. This is not a good sign. The cancer is thought to be using the cholesterol to make estrogen or to shore up tumor membranes to help the cancer migrate and invade more tissue.

In a large study of over a million women, women who had total cholesterol levels over 240 compared to women whose cholesterol was under 160, had a 17 percent increased risk in breast cancer.

STATINS

In a 2013 study, it was found that women who had been taking statins for a decade or more had twice the risk of breast cancer.

FIBER

Inadequate fiber consumption may also be a risk factor for breast cancer. Researchers at Yale University found that premenopausal women who ate the equivalent of about a single cup of black beans had 62 percent lower odds of breast cancer. Premenopausal women on a higher fiber diet had 85 percent lower odds of estrogen-receptor-negative breast tumors. Fiber is only found in plant foods. Supplements did not give an advantage.

A study published in the Annals of Oncology found that daily apple eaters (who also ate the peel) had 24 percent lower odds of breast cancer, as well as significantly lower risks for ovarian cancer, laryngeal cancer and colorectal cancer.

Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli boost the activity of detoxifying enzymes in your liver.

Women eating a tablespoon of ground flaxseeds daily can extend their menstrual cycle by about a day. This means you’ll have fewer periods over the course of a lifetime and, presumably less estrogen exposure and reduced breast cancer risk.

Lignan intake is associated with significantly reduced breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women. Ligans are found in berries, whole grains and dark, leafy greens.

Breast cancer survivors who have higher levels of lignans in their bloodstreams and diets appear to survive significantly longer.

Dietary flaxseed has the potential to reduce tumor growth in patients with breast cancer.

ANTIBIOTICS

Women with frequent urinary tract infections may be at a higher risk of breast cancer. Every course of antibiotics you take can kill bacteria indiscriminately.

SOY

Soy seems to lower breast cancer risk.

Women diagnosed with breast cancer who ate the most soy lived significantly longer and had a significantly lower risk of breast cancer recurrence than those who ate less. The phytoestrogens found in just a single cup of soy milk may reduce the risk of breast cancer returning by 25 percent.

Ninety percent of the breast cancer patients who ate the most soy phytoestrogens after diagnosis were still alive five years later, while half of those who ate little to no soy were dead.

Soy appears to reactivate BRCA genes.

Women at increased genetic risk of breast cancer may especially benefit from high soy intake.

MUSHROOMS AND GREEN TEA

Women whose mushroom consumption averaged just about one-half a mushroom or more per day had 64 percent lower odds of breast cancer compared with women who didn’t eat mushrooms at all.

Eating mushrooms and sipping at least half a tea bag’s worth of green tea each day was associated with nearly 90 percent lower breast cancer odds.

There is so much you can do to lower your risk of breast cancer, even if you have damaged BRCA-1 or BRCA-2 genes.

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© 2010-2017 Melinda Coker

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: “Melinda Coker, health coach and author of the book, Diet and Cancer: Is There a Connection?, teaches men and women around the world how to develop a healthy lifestyle.”

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Nov
25

A Test to Predict Cancer?

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Doctor Prepares to do Diagnostic Tests on Patient

Do you think it’s possible to predict your chance of getting cancer by a blood test, or is that just science fiction?

Many studies have found a correlation between obesity and cancer.  Additional studies have found a correlation between high IGF-1 levels and cancer.  Other studies have reported positive correlations between total body fat and IGF-1 concentrations.

Current recommendations from the World Cancer Research Fund suggest that the median adult BMI (Body Mass Index) should be maintained between 21 and 23.  The chart below gives average BMI scores for people eating certain diets.

TYPE OF DIET

AVERAGE BMI

Raw vegans 21.3
Vegans 23.6
Vegetarians 25.7
Flexitarians 27.3
Meat-eaters 28.8

In rodents, long-term severe caloric restriction (CR) reduced BMI and IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor) levels.  But in research comparing human vegans and long-term endurance runners (ran an average of 48 miles/wk) they found that only the vegans had significantly lower levels of IGF-1.

In other words, just getting slim through exercise without reducing your IGF-1 level could leave you open to higher cancer risks.

 GROUP

IGF-1 PLASMA LEVELS (ng/mL)

Vegans 139
Long-distance Runners 177
Meat Eaters 201

To find out your IGF-1 score, you can take a blood test for $129.  Scores are not “cut and dried” like they are on the BMI chart for adults.  The chart below will give you normal ranges for different age groups.  To protect yourself from cancer, you will want to be sure your IGF-1 is toward the low end for your age group in the chart below.

AGE

NORMAL RANGES OF IGF-1

16-24 182-780
25-39 114-492
40-54 90-360

References:

“Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Relation to Body Mass Index (BMI) in the Million Women Study: Cohort Study”
“A Twenty-First Century Cancer Epidemic Caused by Obesity: The Involvement of Insulin, Diabetes, and Insulin-Like Growth Factors”
“Relationships Between IGF-1 and IGFBP-1 and Adiposity in Obese African-American and Latino Adolescents”
“Long-term Low Protein, Low-caloric Diet and Endurance Exercise Modulate Metabolic Factors Associated with Cancer Risk.”

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Aug
20

Are We Responsible for Getting Sick?

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Fat

When people hear of the diet I eat many of them comment, “Why would you give up all the “good” things to eat just to have more years of old-age misery?”

How many people do you know who are in their 90s and are still energetic and fully engaged in life? We probably all know a few.

By contrast, how many people do you know who are in their 70s and 80s (if they have lived that long) and are sick? They may have osteoporosis, heart disease, dementia, diabetes or cancer. Some are even bedridden after having a stroke. I think we all know plenty of people in this group.

I’m hedging my bets and planning to get to my 90s in good health.

It seems that the word of the day in my community is “responsibility.” When we hear that a family is having a hard time and going on welfare or can’t afford health care, the loudest voices accuse them of not taking “responsibility” for themselves or their families.

I hear people say, “That group works well with the homeless because they hold them accountable for getting back to an independent life,” or, “People having babies out-of-wedlock, just aren’t responsible.”

In other words, most of us think that other people just need to be more “responsible.” I wonder why that word doesn’t apply to the way we take care of our bodies?

What if we used that word on our own lives? Is it responsible of us to eat foods that make us too heavy (a BMI of 25+)? Is it responsible of us to eat foods that can cause diseases like osteoporosis, dementia, heart disease, diabetes, cancer or stroke? Is it responsible of us to continue to smoke because it makes us happy? Is it responsible of us to continue to eat animal products because we like them?

I’ve heard the rationale that if you can afford to drive a gas-guzzler or if you can afford to smoke cigars and drink brandy or if you can afford to eat meat at every meal, that’s your right.

I realize that those individual freedoms are important to many of us. After all, it is your body to do with as you wish. But, other people are definitely impacted. Your spouse or your children may have to step into a caregiver role. You may not be able to afford all of the medical care needed, so the taxpayers have to step in. Because health insurance companies have to pay for more care, they will raise the premium rates for other people.

If you think you are just hurting yourself with your lifestyle choices, think again. What about the husband of the wife diagnosed with cancer? He suffers emotionally almost as much as the patient. What about the kids of the man who suddenly dies of a heart attack? Or the parents of a 50-year-old who has diabetes and has to have his foot amputated?

We take responsibility for keeping our belongings clean and neat. We take responsibility for teaching our children about morals and ethics. We take responsibility for making sure our children go to the best schools and get the best education.

But, are we responsible for making sure our children are always happy and get whatever they want? I doubt if any parent or grandparent would agree to that.

Should we let our kids stay up late at night so they are too tired to pay attention in school so we just hire them a tutor?

Should we let them get tired so their immune systems break down and then we just pay a doctor to give them an antibiotic to get them well?

Do we think we can feed them junk food and then have them pop a few vitamins to keep them healthy?

Do we think we can reward our children with candy and sugary drinks and then just pay a dentist to fix their teeth?

Do we let them eat hamburgers and macaroni and cheese and have ice cream for dessert because that keeps them happy? What do we do when they get fat and are teased and taunted by their classmates?

Being responsible seems to be a matter of degree and personal bias.

If we eat meat and cheese at every meal, but then we bike and run like George W. Bush, shouldn’t that keep us from having a heart stent?

Having responsibility for our own health and that of our children seems to be one of the most important “responsibilities” we can carry out.

What about responsibility for our planet? Is it enough to recycle our cans? Is it enough to keep our thermostat on 78 in the summer? Is it enough to wash clothes with cold water?

One of the most helpful (and responsible) things we can do to help our environment is to stop eating meat. Did you know that raising animals for food uses more water, more land and creates more methane gas than anything else?

Are we responsible for the way animals are treated to provide us with food? We think of those “animals” like we do “slaves” or “muslims.” They are “different” from us. We don’t “know” them.  If we think of those animals and fish in this way, we don’t have to worry about our responsibility for taking care of them.

I’ve got a great idea. Let’s start taking responsibility for the health of our bodies and for the health of our planet!


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© 2010-2013 Melinda Coker

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: “Melinda Coker, health coach and author of the book, Diet and Cancer: Is There a Connection?, teaches women around the world how to develop a healthy lifestyle.”

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Mar
21

Take Control of Your Health

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Take Control

People who have been diagnosed with a traumatic medical condition like cancer, heart disease or diabetes many times feel like they are totally in the hands of their doctors, like all of their control has been taken away.

But, you don’t have to be a victim of what’s happened to you or a victim of extensive medical treatment.  You can take back some control in order to improve your outcomes.  Fit and healthy people have had to learn how to be healthy and you can start your learning right now even in the throes of illness.  Look for people who can coach you or find books or web sites with the information you need, i.e., find out what your choices are and then make decisions which will move you towards health.

Doctors have told me that their patients don’t have the time or energy to change their lifestyle.  That’s an excuse they are making for you.  I know that you are busy and you are probably overwhelmed with all the decisions you are having to make, but let go of the excuses.  They just don’t serve you well.

Take control of your body.  Don’t give that control to someone else, even your doctor.  You’ve got to choose the healthiest way forward.  You’ve got to make healthy choices even when it’s challenging, inconvenient or considered weird by your family or friends.

You CAN be a winner!

© 2010-2011 Melinda Coker

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: “Melinda Coker, health coach and author of the book, Diet and Cancer: Is There a Connection?, teaches women around the world how to develop a healthy lifestyle.” 

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Dec
21

5 Tips for Health in the New Year

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DCC_Walking1.) Eat a healthy diet… that means going towards a plant-based diet as much as you possibly can.  The more animal products you eliminate, the more fat and cholesterol you eliminate, too.  The more vegetables, fruits and whole grains you include, the more fiber you consume.  Vegetarians are healthier and slimmer.

2.) Exercise… you need to keep moving… walking is good, especially if you can get out in the fresh air.  Strength training is important once or twice a week and you may want to add some stretching, yoga, or pilates for flexibility.

3.) Stay curious… You must always be interested in new ideas or new skills.  Take classes, read, change jobs, create a project with your kids or grandkids or take up a new hobby.  You can become an expert by learning and researching something you love… whether it’s travel, photography, writing, building furniture or even Facebook.

4.) Stay involved… Go where you can interact with others… join clubs, attend church, meet friends for lunch, join the PTA, or care for your grandkids.

5.) Find someone to help… volunteer, care for a pet, send cards and notes to friends and acquaintances, or mentor a child.

If you’ve let yourself get lazy this year, see if you can’t develop these new healthy habits for 2011.  Even if you are already healthy, I bet you can find something in this list to help you become even healthier.  Here’s to the healthiest year ever!!

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© 2010 Melinda Coker

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: “Melinda Coker, author of the book, Diet and Cancer: Is There a Connection?, passionate health researcher and coach, teaches women around the world how to develop a healthy lifestyle.”

Categories : Blog, Prevent Cancer
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Sep
30

My New Book

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For the past eighteen months I have been diligently working on a book. I had three very good friends who were diagnosed with cancer within months of each other and that got me started thinking about the randomness of the disease. When my beloved standard poodle was diagnosed with bladder cancer, I started researching ways to help him. After all, he was my responsibility and he depended on me for everything. I found that much more research had been done for people with cancer rather than for dogs, and, at some point during all of that upheaval, I decided to try to write down and organize the information I had found.

The more you write, the more you learn and then you have to write some more. During all the writing and then the grueling editing process I just kept going. After my dog and two of my friends died, I knew that I had to actually bring this book to fruition. I couldn’t give up.

When all the writing and editing was done and it was time to put the book out for publication, I went into panic mode for a few days as I realized that once the book was published I would be open for criticism. However, if we never do anything for which we might be criticized we are probably doing nothing. At least I DID SOMETHING, and actually, I truly hope that this book might save some lives. I realize the book won’t save lives, but maybe it will give some guidance to people who are interested in saving their own life. You can order the book Diet and Cancer: Is There a Connection?at AMAZON.

© 2010 Melinda Coker

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: “Passionate health researcher and coach, Melinda Coker teaches women around the world how to develop a healthy lifestyle.”

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Jul
29

Calcium

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How do you get your calcium if you are a vegan? You have to be a bit more creative and use vegetables, beans and seeds rather than just drinking a glass of milk.

Kale, turnip greens, collard greens, bok choy, mustard greens, Swiss chard, lettuces, rhubarb, spinach, dandelion greens, artichokes, broccoli and other dark green vegetables are all excellent sources of calcium.

Almonds contain more calcium than other nuts. Most beans are fair sources of calcium, as is soy milk and tofu. Some fruits with good calcium levels include figs, papaya and raisins. Sesame seeds and tahini are very high in calcium.

Other non-dairy sources of calcium include raw parsley, sun-dried tomatoes, raw Spanish peanuts, corn, wheat, brown rice,oats and pumpkin seeds. Quinoa (pronounced keen-wah) is a grain that contains as much calcium as an entire quart of milk.

The U.S. daily recommended intake of calcium is between 800mg and 1,200mg. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends only 400-500 milligrams of daily calcium. If you eat one cup of beans, four tablespoons of tahini and five figs you will have gotten over 500 mg of calcium.

Non-dairy sources of calcium are usually good sources of fiber, folic acid, magnesium, potassium and even protein. Plant-based proteins are more alkaline than animal proteins. Meat and milk are very acidic sources of protein and actually cause the body to leech calcium from the bones in order to neutralize the acid.

© 2010 Melinda Coker

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: “Passionate health researcher and coach, Melinda Coker teaches women around the world how to develop a healthy lifestyle.”

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Jul
25

Introduction

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FruitWelcome… This is a companion site to the recently published book, “Diet and Cancer: Is There a Connection?” There has been much research done and many published studies over the past 50-years dealing with the effects of diet and health. In fact, there are new studies coming out weekly. This blog will attempt to keep you updated about some of those important studies and will try to explain some of the information that we already know. After reading this new book, you will probably be thinking about changing some of your habits and living in a more healthy manner. Maybe this blog will help to keep you informed and inspired. Come back often!

© 2010 Melinda Coker

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: “Passionate health researcher and coach, Melinda Coker teaches women around the world how to develop a healthy lifestyle.”

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Jul
24

A Book

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Diet and Cancer: Is There a Connection? Eat more fruits and vegetables. Isn’t that what your mother always told you? I hope to add credence to that old saying with the launch of my new book, DIET AND CANCER: IS THERE A CONNECTION? HEALTH SECRETS TO SLOWING CANCER IF YOU HAVE IT & PREVENTING CANCER IF YOU DON’T.

It’s a well-researched book which discusses the topic of cancer: how it starts, how it grows, risk factors and preventive measures you can take. You will want to read this book if you have cancer or if you want to avoid cancer. You will want to read this book if you are at higher risk for cancer because you have a close relative who has or has had cancer. You will want to read this book if you want to protect your family from cancer. This book is for you, if you are interested in health and you want to live a healthy life.

© 2010 Melinda Coker

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: “Passionate health researcher and coach, Melinda Coker teaches women around the world how to develop a healthy lifestyle.”

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May
20

Younger Next Year

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It all started when my husband gave me a book to read called, Younger Next Year. At the time we were on a trip to Williamsburg, VA and I basically finished the book during our travel day. WOW! It was good. Written by Chris Crowley who gives you his own personal journey and Dr. Harry Lodge who gives you the scientific reasons for their suggestions.

What they suggest is vigorous exercise six days a week. In return, after age 50 your body will actually grow physiologically younger each year. In fact, they say that you can avoid 70 percent of the decay and eliminate 50 percent of the injuries and illnesses associated with getting older.

After I returned home and added more intensity to my workouts, joined a gym and signed up for strength training, I wanted to tell all of my friends about this new found wonder “drug.”

I started giving books to people only to discover they weren’t reading them, so I decided to bring Chris to our town to talk to my friends. Now that was a real job. I spent a lot of time over a 6-month period trying to make it all happen. And, I did. That was FUN and Chris was a delight! We had a Preview Party one evening and a Luncheon for Women the next day.

Just as the women were arriving at the country club to attend the luncheon, the skies opened up and we had quite a thunderstorm – wind, heavy rain, lightening, and thunder! Fortunately, most of the women waded on in and we were able to enjoy a wonderful event.

Rain
A Story from the Luncheon Day
Not all the women did make it through the storm to the luncheon, however. One woman called to say that her electricity had gone out the night before (during another storm) so she had gotten ready in the dark and couldn’t even blow dry her hair… (now that’s a BIG DEAL to a Texas woman!), but she still planned to come.

After getting all ready, she went out to her garage and had to pull the “manual” cord to try to raise the garage door since the automatic garage door opener was powered by electricity. But, the manual release wouldn’t even work! She could NOT get her car out of her garage.

She called a friend who had already arrived at the luncheon to tell her that she was in her garage, but unable to come.

That’s when you use the old expression, “…all dressed up and nowhere to go!”

© 2010 Melinda Coker

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE? You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it: “Passionate health researcher and coach, Melinda Coker teaches women around the world how to develop a healthy lifestyle.”

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